Sunday, October 22, 2017

Maple-Kissed Horchata #AroundtheWorldwithRice

I made a batch of horchata last week for SEM. You can read about that here. This week, since we were making a traditional Mexican rice, I decided to make another batch of horchata.



Funny story: my co-teacher is from Spain. And when she saw that I was making horchata for class, she was perplexed. In Spain, horchata is not made with rice; it's made with a kind of nut. So, she didn't know how that was applicable to our class.



For this version, I decided to skip the granulated sugar and use some maple syrup instead. I also used less water for a thicker version. The kids - and my husband - thought this was a better horchata.

Ingredients
  • 1 C uncooked rice (I used Thai jasmine rice)
  • 1 C boiling water
  • 2 C warm water
  • 1 C milk (you can use any kind of milk - rice, almond, etc. - I used whole cow's milk)
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1/4 C maple syrup
  • 2 t pure vanilla extract
  • 1 t ground cinnamon
  • Also needed: food processor or blender, mesh strainer or cheesecloth
Procedure
Add rice and 1 C boiling water to a blender (preferably high-speed blender) and let stand for at least 10 minutes for the rice to soften. Blend for several minutes until the rice is broken up a bit. Pour into a lidded jar and add remaining water. Add in the cinnamon stick and let sit for 2-4 hours.

Add milk, ground cinnamon, vanilla and maple syrup and give it a quick stir to mix it up. Let sit for another 2 to 4 hours – longer is fine, too!

Strain the horchata through a cheesecloth-lined fine mesh sieve and press out the pulp in the cheesecloth. Discard the rice pulp and serve the horchata with ice.

Saturday, October 21, 2017

Creepy Eyeball Martini #HalloweenFoodFun


Carlee of Cooking with Carlee invited us all for some Halloween Food Fun. While the fun factor is in the eyeball garnish, I have to admit that the cocktail is pretty darn tasty, too.


All the Fun Creations...

Creepy Eyeball Martini

Ingredients makes 1 cocktail

  • 2 ounce gin
  • 1-1/2 ounces syrup fro the canned lychees
  • 1 ounce Chartreuse liqueur
  • Also needed: cocktail shaker, ice cubes

Eyeball Garnish

  • canned lychees
  • blueberries
  • skewers


Procedure
Drain the lychees, reserving the canning syrup for the cocktail. Place a blueberry in the lychee to form the eyeballs, then skewer them to make a pair.


Fill a cocktail shaker with ice. Pour all the ingredients into the shaker. Shake well and strain into a serving glass.


Serve immediately! Cheers.


To make these non-alcoholic substitute, just use the lychee syrup and sparkling water. The boys were happy to be able to take part in the pre-Halloween fun.

Friday, October 20, 2017

An Easy Dinner with Anchoïade and Mas Cavalier de Lascaux #Winophiles


This weekend the French Winophiles are heading to Languedoc, formerly Coteaux du Languedoc. It's an appellation in France's Languedoc-Roussillon wine region and produces mostly red wines. I read that 75% of all Languedoc wines are red; and the remaining 25% of the wines are split evenly between whites and rosés.

The typical Languedoc red is medium-bodied and fruit-forward wine. And most of the time, the grape varietals used are Grenache, Syrah and Mourvedre, sometimes with hints of Carignan or Cinsaut.


In My Glass...
The vineyards of Château de Lascaux have been in the family for thirteen generations. The name of the domaine, “Lascaux” comes from a limestone specific to the domaine’s vineyard sites. Jean-Benoît Cavalier took over management of the property in 1984. Over the course of the next decade, he consolidated the vineyards, restructured the ancient cellars, and created the official domaine, Château de Lascaux.

A quarter of a century later, the domaine has more than tripled its hectares of vineyards and is completely surrounded by three hundred hectares of forest, filled with deciduous oaks, evergreen pines, and garrigue. Those aromatics are reflected in the wines with notes of laurel, thyme, rosemary, and mint. There is an intriguing balance of freshness and finesse in the Lascaux wines.

I found this deeply hued wine approachable with subtle aromas of fruit with floral undertones. The same fruity richness bathes the palate to make this an easy-drinking Languedoc.


On My Plate...
For my pairing, I decided on a unique salad from Languedoc called anchoïade, a tomato and anchovy salad that is a celebration of land and sea.


I couldn't find the salt-packed anchovies that are traditionally in this salad. So, I used some sustainably fished anchovies packed in water. If I ever get my hands on the salt-packed ones, I'll definitely make this again.

Anchoïade (Tomato and Anchovy Salad)

Ingredients
  • 8 anchovy fillets
  • 1 to 2 large heirloom tomatoes, sliced into thin wedges
  • 2 large eggs, hard-boiled, shelled and halved
  • ¼ C extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 T white wine vinegar
  • 1 t Dijon mustard
  • ¼ C capers
  • freshly ground salt to taste
  • freshly ground pepper to taste


Procedure
Arrange the tomatoes on a platter. Drape the anchovy fillets over the tomatoes and sprinkle with capers. Add the eggs to the platter.

Make the vinaigrette by whisking together the olive oil, vinegar, and mustard. Drizzle the dressing over the tomatoes and anchovies. Sprinkle with salt and pepper

Cioppino, a San Francisco Contribution to the Culinary World #SoupSwappers


In January, Wendy of A Day in the Life on the Farm kicked off her new group: Soup Saturday Swappers.

This month Ashley of Cheese Curd in Paradise is hosting. And she wrote: "Share a recipe unique to your state, city, or even your neighborhood!"

I am SO excited about this as it is definitely turning to soup season. And I love having new recipes, especially if they are regional and meaningful to my fellow blogging friends! Thanks for the inspiration, Ashley.

The Regional Soup Pot




San Francisco

Besides Rome, San Francisco is my favorite city. Here I am with my Love, years ago, on a weekend get-away with some friends. We usually hit the City every December to celebrate our younger son's birthday (he's a Christmas baby). San Francisco is close enough for us (just a 2 hour drive without traffic) to be accessible for a quick day trip, but it's also just far enough to be special.



And Jake and I just spent the weekend up there a couple of weeks ago while the boys were in Hawaii with my parents. We hit three art museums, a coffee roaster, and had two delicious meals in less than 24-hours. I never say no to a mid-day bloody mary and a few hours at an art museum. Notice, he's drinking an Anchor Steam, a beer made in San Francisco.

Cioppino is NOT From Italy

Let's start with this: Contrary to popular belief, cioppino is not an Italian dish. Cioppino was an American invention of the Italian fishermen of North Beach in San Francisco. I've read a lot of different accounts. I'm going to share the one that makes the most sense to me.

Cioppino is a tomato-based seafood stew that was invented during the late 19th century for fisherman to use whatever seafood was leftover from the day’s catch. Often it was crab, shrimp, clams, and fish; historically, it was made on the fishing boats while out at sea as well as in homes. But as Italian restaurants started sprouting up around the wharf, cioppino became a popular dish.

Ingredients serves 6 to 8

  • 2 medium onions, finely chopped
  • 4 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 1 red bell pepper, cored and diced
  • 2 California bay leaves
  • 6 C broth or stock (I use organic chicken stock)
  • 1 C clam juice
  • one 15-ounce can crushed tomatoes
  • one 15-ounce can tomato sauce
  • 1 C red wine
  • 1 T hot sauce or 1 t dried red pepper flakes
  • 1 pound wild caught large shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 pound wild caught salmon, deboned and cubed
  • 1 pound squid, cleaned (I like a mixture of tubed - sliced - and tentacles)
  • 1 pound clams or mussels (for this pot, I couldn't find clams)
  • 1 T fresh oregano leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 C fresh parsley, chopped
  • freshly ground salt, to taste
  • freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • Also needed: sourdough bread, for serving

Procedure
Heat olive oil in a large, heavy pot. Add in the garlic, onions, and bay leaves. Cook till aromatic, approximately 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in the red pepper and cook for another 2 minutes. Pour in the stock, clam juice, crushed tomatoes, tomato sauce, red wine, and hot sauce. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes.


While stew is simmering, prep your seafood. Add the seafood to the pot, timing so that the ones that will take the longest to cook will be done around the same time as the ones that need to barely be blanched. Add in the mussels and cook until they open. Discard the mussels that don't open.

Discard bay leaves, then gently stir in parsley and oregano. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve cioppino immediately in large soup bowls with hunks of sourdough bread.

A note: If you want to save some time on the day you're serving this, you can make the broth the day before. Let cool completely, then refrigerate. Bring the broth to a simmer before adding the seafood.


Thinking about when we can get to San Francisco next...we all love it.

Gonzalez Family 20-Minute Mexican Rice #AroundtheWorldwithRice


Today Jenn came to my Around the World with Rice class and shared a recipe with us that has been passed down through her husband’s family for generations. She shared that Mike’s mom learned from his Grandma who was married very young and moved in with her in-laws. Her mother-in-law taught her everything about cooking.

Most of the kids had had Mexican rice before. When we finally sat down to eat, Jenn was tickled to hear one of the kids declare: "This is ten times better than the rice at Papa Chano's!" Sweet.


We talked about a molcajete which is a stone tool, the traditional Mexican version of the mortar and pestle. It’s similar to the South American batan and used for grinding various foods.

When Mike came by and tasted the rice, toward the end of class, he told us that he doubles the amount of cumin seed, pepper, garlic, and tomato sauce from his grandmother's recipe. But it's hers that I've shared below.


Ingredients

  • 4 T oil
  • 2 C long grain rice
  • 2 t cumin seed
  • 1 t pepper
  • 2-4 cloves garlic
  • 2 T Knorr chicken stock
  • 1/2 minced yellow onion
  • ½  can (8 oz can) tomato sauce
  • 4 C water

Procedure
Fry rice in oil on low heat till lightly toasted. Add onions until they start to turn translucent.


Grind cumin, pepper, garlic, and chicken stock in molcajete.


Add spices, tomato sauce and water to pan. Bring to a boil and add about 2 t salt (to taste). It
should taste a little salty. Bring to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to low. Cook for 20 minutes.

Optional: Add frozen veggies. Another variation is to partially cook chicken (boil breasts, thighs, pieces) and then put the chicken in after step 3.

{Gluten-Free} Salmon, Prawn, and Zucchini Pasta #fishfridayfoodies


It's time for Fish Friday Foodies' October event. We are a group of seafood-loving bloggers, rallied by Wendy of A Day in the Life on the Farm, to share fish and seafood recipes on the third Friday of the month. This is, easily, my favorite recipe sharing event of the month. I always come away with a list of recipes that I just have to try!

This month, Claire of Sprinkles and Sprouts is hosting. She asked us to toss some fish or seafood into pasta and share it with you all. 

So, after three years of being gluten-free - he doesn't have Celiac disease or any other medical condition that requires him to be gluten-free - Jake has decided he will ease back into gluten, but he does want to focus more on consuming lower carbs. And, after three years, of adapting recipes or, sometimes, making two different dishes for dinner, I am elated. But I still have a cupboard full of gluten-free pasta!

So, I'm sharing this recipe with gluten-free pasta, locally-caught wild salmon, prawns, and the last of the summer squash. It's a quick, easy dinner. But, first, here's the #FishFridayFoodies collective pasta bowl...




Salmon, Prawn, and Zucchini Sauce

Ingredients
  • 1/4 C olive oil + more for serving
  • 1/2 C diced white onion
  • 2 C diced zucchini and/or summer squash
  • 2 T water
  • 1/2 pound salmon (deboned and cut into large cubes)
  • 1/2 pound prawns (if you can, I prefer wild - not farmed - and local seafood)
  • 1/4 C wine (I used a Rosé)
  • sea salt
  • Also needed cooked pasta (I used gluten-free) and grated cheese for serving


Procedure
Peel prawns, devein, and chop into bite-size pieces.


Heat olive oil in a large, flat-bottom pan. Add onion and cook until softened and translucent, approximately 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the zucchini and add the water. Cover and cook until the zucchini is tender, approximately 5 minutes.

Add in the prawns  and salmon. Pour in the wine. Simmer until the seafood is pink and opaque. Season to taste with salt.

To serve, toss in the cooked pasta. Add a splash of olive and toss until well-coated and glossy. Scoop into individual serving bowls and sprinkle with grated cheese.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Agua de Horchata #AroundtheWorldwithRice

If you've been following me for awhile, you've heard me talk about SEM. It's a once-a-week, elective class that runs in six-week sessions at my son's school. I love it and I've taught everything ocean conservation to dragon myths. Eventually, I moved to culinary adventures and taught everything from Spices Around the World to Bizarre Foods and International Cheese Board to, this term, I'm teaching Around the World with Rice with my friend Susana.


This may be my last SEM as it's my youngest son's 8th grade year; or I might be convinced to do one more before he graduates. We'll see.

In any case, week one is always even shorter on time than the other five week. We do introductions, talk about class procedure, go over kitchen safety, etc. Today I had planned to talk about rice - as a grass with an edible seed -; go over where rice is grown and how; and talk about different culinary traditions that use rice. So, I knew there wouldn't be much time for cooking.

We are sampling some pre-made mochi and rice crackers. But I wanted to at least make one thing. I decided to make horchata. My boys love it! And it's so easy, I can't imagine why I don't make it more often.

Ingredients
  • 1 C uncooked rice (I used Thai jasmine rice)
  • 4 C warm water
  • 1 C milk (you can use any kind of milk - rice, almond, etc. - I used whole cow's milk)
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1/4 C organic granulated sugar
  • 2 t pure vanilla extract
  • 1 t ground cinnamon
  • Also needed: food processor or blender, mesh strainer or cheesecloth
Procedure
Add rice, 1 C water, and cinnamon stick to a blender (preferably high-speed blender) and blend for several minutes until the rice is broken up a bit. Pour into a lidded jar and add remaining water. Let sit for 2-4 hours.

Add milk, ground cinnamon, vanilla and maple syrup and give it a quick stir to mix it up. Let sit for another 2 to 4 hours – longer is fine, too!

Strain the horchata through a cheesecloth-lined fine mesh sieve and press out the pulp in the cheesecloth. Discard the rice pulp and serve the horchata with ice.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Seared Albacore Loins Salad with San-J Tamari Dressing #sanjtamarilite #MomsMeet #Sponsored

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Moms Meet
I received complimentary product for the purpose of review, 
but all opinions are honest and they are my own. This page may contain affiliate links.

Growing up in a Filipino family, soy sauce was on the table at every family event. But, years ago, when my husband went gluten-free I had to be careful about that condiment. So, when I was offered the opportunity to do a product review and develop a recipe with a gluten-free tamari by San-J, I was excited! And, as an added bonus, this version also had half the sodium. Sweet.


About San-J 
In 1804, San-Jirushi, the founding company of San-J, started a tamari soy sauce and miso company in the Mie Prefecure on the Japanese island of Honshu. Nearly two centuries later, the first tamari brewery was built in Henrico, Virginia as San-J. Eight generations later, a member of the founding family is still continuing the tradition of quality with a range of tamari soy sauces, Asian-inspired cooking sauces, salad dressings, and snack crackers.

Some Facts...
• 50% Less Sodium than regular San-J Tamari
• Certified Gluten-free
• Certified Kosher
• Non-GMO Project-Verified
• Contains no artificial preservatives, flavors or colors
• Made with 100% Soy
• Price, approximately: $4.39 for 10-ounce bottle or $7.49 for 20-ounce bottle

San-J Tamari Lite 50% Less Sodium Gluten Free Soy Sauce is available to purchase at Whole Foods
Market, Kroger, Food Lion, Sprouts Farmers Market, Albertsons, and other major grocery stores. To find a store near you, visit: here.

Seared Albacore Loins Salad 
with San-J Tamari Dressing 

When I received a delivery of Albacore loins from my local CSF (community-supported fishery) today, I knew that I wanted to use it to highlight the San-J Tamari!


Albacore is a smaller member of the tuna family that has been shown to have low or undetectable mercury levels. They are mostly caught offshore, and unlike most local fishing boats, albacore boats may be at sea for days on end. In those cases, they are flash-frozen to preserve their freshness. Albacore tuna is highly versatile, and when you get sushi-grade tuna, it's perfectly fine to eat it raw.

For this recipe, however, I was inspired to sear the Albacore loins and serve them on top of some hearty baby greens, using a mixture of kale, spinach, arugula and mizuna - a Japanese mustard green.

Ingredients serves 4

  • 12 to 16 ounces sushi-grade Albacore tuna loins
  • 1 T olive oil
  • 1 t toasted sesame oil
  • 6 C mixed baby greens 
Dressing
  • 1/2 C finely chopped organic yellow onion
  • 3 T tamari (I used San-J Tamari Lite 50% Less Sodium Gluten Free Soy Sauce)
  • 3 T rice vinegar
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 2 T toasted sesame oil
  • 1 t yellow mustard
  • 1 t maple syrup
  • 1/2 t ground ginger
  • Also needed: lidded mason jar
Procedure

Dressing
Place all of the ingredient in a mason jar. Tighten the lid and shake to combine. Set aside.

Seared Albacore
Preheat a skillet. Pour in the olive oil and sesame oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan. Wait till the oil begin to bubble.


Pat the albacore dry and sear the tuna on all sides until the surface is nicely browned. Remove the tuna to a cutting board.

Toss the greens with the dressing and move to individual serving plates.  Slice the tuna into 1/4" to 1/2" thick slices.

Top the salad greens with sliced tuna. Drizzle with more dressing, if desired.


I also served steamed sushi rice with raw sliced toro, Albacore tuna belly. For that dish, I served some Sweet & Tangy and Hoisin sauce from San-J for dipping.


You may find San-J Tamari...
on the web
on Twitter

*Disclosure: I received this product for free from the sponsor of the Moms Meet programMay Media Group LLC, who received it directly from the manufacturer. As a Moms Meet blogger, I agree to use this product and post my opinion on my blog. My opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinions of May Media Group LLC or the manufacturer of this product.

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